Tuesday, March 16, 2010

"Legislative Sleight of Hand"

I normally have avoided using my blog as a soapbox for my political beliefs. However, I simply cannot remain silent on recent events in the House of Representatives (United States for foreign readers.

No matter what your position is on the health care reforms under consideration, everyone should agree that the reforms are sweeping; perhaps some of the most significant legislation that will affect nearly every American we've seen in quite some time.

House Democratic leadership, knowing that the measure is unpopular with many voters (and hence House Democrats may be unlikely to "vote the party line" to avoid a backlash in their constituencies) are planning a move that is even more offensive than "reconciliation".

While I'm a Republican, and generally opposed to nationalization of 1/6th of our economy, I find far more offensive that the House leadership (particularly Ms. Pelosi) would consider a move that so boldly disenfranchises the people of this nation.

This is a crime, if not against the law, then certainly against the spirit of democracy upon which our country is founded. If health care reform is to be passed, then it should be done with a regular vote where the politicians who vote for it are required to be accountable for those votes (and vice versa, by the way).

If it passes without such a vote, then it will go down as one of the greatest failures of "representative democracy" in history.

5 comments:

myunix.org said...

From the article..."Republicans also used the tactic when they controlled the House"

Garrett D'Amore said...

Of course, both parties have used the tactic. However, its normally applied to budgetary measures that have little impact or visibility to the voting population.

This case, where the vote is being used to effectively subvert the will of voters on a matter that will affect almost everyone, and which almost everyone is aware of and has an opinion, is what I find so offensive.

Es Que said...

Set aside all the partisanship thoughts for a moment and think about this. The way things are being done in congress in general is so complicated and so fraught with back room deals that no one could hope to unravel it and foist responsibility on any one person.

Set aside that fact that if I were to operate in my business this way that I would be in jail.

Set aside that the vast majority of the populace seems to feel like it is being ignored.

What really bugs me is that even if I tried to explain this process, as it is, to a child of the next generation I could not. Growing up, I was taught the constitution and government and could understand their roles and operation. Obviously it was from a child's simplified point of view but at least I remember feeling like I could grasp it and one day be a part of it.

Try passing that feeling on today. I think you will end up frustrated. Worse yet is that what would probably be passed along to the child is the feeling of animosity for the way things are and and the instant hyper-partisanship that is evident even in the first comment on this blog entry.

What is evident in this entire debate and of course this process in general the arrogance of many people in the process. The entire mentality of 'sure we can and no one will have to pay for it' is obscene. What is just the height of outrage is that though all of the process there are always exceptions and exemptions for themselves. It seems that what is good for the masses is not good enough for themselves.

If I wanted to be ruled by an aristocrat class or a dictator there are many places I would move to. This country should not be one of them.

Sorry for the long comment.

what said...

Maybe if you stopped listening to radicals you wouldn't be been tricked into repeating this nonsense

Garrett D'Amore said...

"Nonsense"? I'm not listening to "radicals", but I suppose anyone who believes in a free market economy might be a radical to someone who is a firm believer in socialism and entitlement.

Now that said, it appears that our politicians have managed to avoid using the self-executing rule, so that part at least is over.

What's interesting to me is that the Democrats still passed this measure knowing that most of their constituents were opposed to it. I expect they'll pay for it with their jobs in the next round of elections.

I don't want to get into the specific issues surrounding health care reform here. I remain opposed, but as with the selection of our President, I can remain opposed and life will move forward.

That said, there are still some "process" hurdles remaining, but at this point, the debate is largely over I think, and we have to live with the system that has been thrust upon us, willing or no.